Clay Apenouvon (b. 1970, Lomé) and lives and works in in Paris (France). 

 

Apenouvon creates works with material and objects, often jet-black and heaving massive bundles of black plastic and rope. Often the substances cover entire spaces, commenting on the invisibility of black artists. Art is a cure, a way to express, and Apenouvon utilizes his practice as an outlet for his past personal suffering. His material choice emphasizes the scarcity of typical artistic supplies compared to the myriad of waste products, particularly cardboard and packaging. 

 

Leveraging installation as his mode of presenting, his recent series, “Plastic Attack” raises awareness of the danger plastic poses globally. Apenouvon seeks to express the “fatal beauty” of plastic by portraying a foreseen disaster. 

 

Apenouvon lives and works in Aubervilliers (France) and Lomé (Togo). He presented his recent installation, Film Noir de Lampedusa at the Foundation Blachere, Visibles / Invisibles, l’Afrique urbaine et ses marges, 2015.